Rush Hour in the Tallgrass

Sure, it may look tranquil– from a distance.

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But on the last day of May, you can feel the urgency on the prairie. Things get a little crowded; plants begin to jostle each other for available space.

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The urgency is there in the alien-looking pale purple coneflowers, which merge into the tallgrass. Then they push, push, push their petals out into the fast lane.

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You can feel the nature putting her foot down on the gas pedal. Dragonflies shed their underwater nymph status, pump out wings, then lift to the sky. What a ride!

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Other commuters, like the damselflies, are deceptively still. They startle you when they suddenly dart out into air traffic to snag an unwary insect near the water’s edge.

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New blooms appear each day, bumper to bumper. Each has its host of pollinators. They fuel up, then collect their tiny bags of gold dust. They share the wealth, from bloom to bloom.

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The flowers range from jazzy, eye-popping hoary puccoon…

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..to the pale, meadow rue buds; unnoticeable like a family sedan…

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…and prairie alum root flowers, that sport some extra detail work, if you look closely.

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The earliest spring bloomers signal the work of flowering is over, and drive home seeds.

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Deep within the fast lane; amid the crush of the prairie blooms…

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…a thousand insect motors are idling. They accelerate into a buzz of activity, a hum of new adventures unfolding.

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It’s the last day of May on the prairie. Summer is on the horizon. What adventures await you in the tallgrass?

This is one rush hour you don’t want to miss.

All photos copyright Cindy Crosby (top to bottom): Schulenberg Prairie Visitor Station area, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL; pale beardtongue (Penstemon pallidus), Schulenberg Prairie, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL; three photos of pale purple coneflower  (Echinacea pallida) opening, Schulenberg Prairie, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL; female calico pennant (Celithemis elisa), Schulenberg Prairie, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL; eastern forktail (Ischnura verticalis), Nachusa Grasslands, Franklin Grove, IL; spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis) with a pollinator, author’s backyard prairie, Glen Ellyn, IL; hoary puccoon (Lithospernum canescens), Schulenberg Prairie, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL; purple meadow rue (Thalictrum dasycarpum), author’s backyard prairie, Glen Ellyn, IL; prairie alum root (Heuchera richardsonii), Schulenberg Prairie, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL; bastard toadflax (Comandra umbellata) going to seed, Schulenberg Prairie, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL; prairie phlox  (Phlox pilosa) and spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis) with grasses, Schulenberg Prairie, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL;  bee on wild white indigo or false indigo (Baptisia alba v. macrophylla).

4 responses to “Rush Hour in the Tallgrass

  1. Susan Whiteman

    Cindy – I love this! Thank you for your words and pictures and for our walk today.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you, Susan, for all the work you do for prairie restoration!

    Like

  3. Jeannine Kannegiesser

    Very nice. I spent some quiet moments spying on bees visiting Baptisia this week. I like your photo.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Love it that you are spying on the bees! 🙂

    Like

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